this picture just really bugs me 
is she taking her stocking off? is she putting it on? why does she have that other shoe on? because if she’s putting her stocking on and then is going to put her left shoe on, why is her right shoe already off? and if she’s taking her stocking off, why wasn’t she wearing one on her right leg? 
so many questions 

this picture just really bugs me 

is she taking her stocking off? is she putting it on? why does she have that other shoe on? because if she’s putting her stocking on and then is going to put her left shoe on, why is her right shoe already off? and if she’s taking her stocking off, why wasn’t she wearing one on her right leg? 

so many questions 

(Source: allthebeautythatiswoman, via ovfireandkhaos)

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cultureunseen:

BLACK JEWS
(…nuff said.)

(via stuffwhitepeopleask)

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(Source: burgertv, via burgertv)

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think-thank-thunk:

Me flirting

think-thank-thunk:

Me flirting

(via ethiopienne)

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thekidshouldseethis:

A brilliantly simple visual explanation in just two minutes: the dog’s variable meandering represents the weather, while Dr. Tyson’s steady path represents climate change. This is how rising global temperatures and very cold winters can happen all at the same time.
“Keep your eye on the man, not the dog.”
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

A brilliantly simple visual explanation in just two minutes: the dog’s variable meandering represents the weather, while Dr. Tyson’s steady path represents climate change. This is how rising global temperatures and very cold winters can happen all at the same time.

“Keep your eye on the man, not the dog.”

Watch the video.

307 Notes

(Source: conniecann, via totalhunk)

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Cosima Niehaus~

(Source: tinakris, via burning-wings-of-castiel)

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historicaltimes:

20 year old Princess Elizabeth, in her sitting room at Buckingham Palace, July 19, 1946 -
Read More

historicaltimes:

20 year old Princess Elizabeth, in her sitting room at Buckingham Palace, July 19, 1946 -

Read More

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(Source: feyminism, via c4duceus)

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(Source: citationneeded, via c4duceus)

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Ben Barres is a biologist at Stanford who lived and worked as Barbara Barres until he was in his forties. For most of his career, he experienced bias, but didn’t give much weight to it—seeing incidents as discrete events. (When he solved a tough math problem, for example, a professor said, “You must have had your boyfriend solve it.”) When he became Ben, however, he immediately noticed a difference in his everyday experience: “People who don’t know I am transgendered treat me with much more respect,” he says. He was more carefully listened to and his authority less frequently questioned. He stopped being interrupted in meetings. At one conference, another scientist said, “Ben gave a great seminar today—but then his work is so much better than his sister’s.” (The scientist didn’t know Ben and Barbara were the same person.) “This is why women are not breaking into academic jobs at any appreciable rate,” he wrote in response to Larry Summers’s famous gaffe implying women were less innately capable at the hard sciences. “Not childcare. Not family responsibilities,” he says. “I have had the thought a million times: I am taken more seriously.”
Why Aren’t Women Advancing At Work? Ask A Transgender Person | Jessica Nordell for The New Republic (via gaywrites)

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cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

(via totalhunk)

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